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Intro
The Bowen Road Slope Study Trail was developed by the Geotechnical Engineering Office (GEO), Civil Engineering and Development Department (CEDD). It aims to facilitate teachers, students and interested members of the public to learn about the common slope works in Hong Kong by taking a stroll along Bowen Road, including various landslide prevention and mitigation as well as slope greening and landscaping measures.
(1) Slope greening in Hong Kong
Urban development in Hong Kong intersects with the city’s steep hillsides, so that both natural and man-made slopes are now an integral part of the cityscape. It is the Government’s policy to make these slopes look as natural as possible, not only to create a pleasing appearance, but also to nurture ecologically suitable hillslope environments. In this connection, GEO encourages tree retention and provides vegetation cover for all upgraded man-made slopes and natural terrain hazard mitigation measures wherever practicable, so that these areas blend in with the adjacent natural environment. GEO also sets appropriate planting goals for slope works. For example, Ecological Planting is adopted for slopes located in rural areas and urban fringes that are connected to natural vegetation, where mostly native trees and shrubs are planted to maximise the ecological benefit. Among the 300,000 plants planted each year in the landslip prevention and mitigation works, over 90% are native species.
(2) Landscaping the Ecological Enhancement at Bowen Road
Two major landslides occurred above Bowen Road during a heavy rainstorm in August 2005 and forced a school to close for more than three weeks. Emergency repair works involved the use of shotcrete and temporary soil nails, which alleviated the imminent risk of further slope degradation, but left behind a landslide scar on the woody hillside above Bowen Road. In response, GEO implemented innovative landscape treatments by constructing a series of terraces along the steeply sloped surface to reshape the ground profile. These terraces were designed to be large enough to hold sufficient soil for the proliferation of a variety of plants, and support long-term plant growth. The plants chosen consisted predominantly of native species which are also beneficial to local wildlife. This project demonstrated that landscape treatments can be integrated into the city’s natural terrain hazard mitigation works and be conducive to biodiversity.
The theme for Eco Expo Asia 2018 is Waste Less Save More for a Low-Carbon Future. The last day (28 Oct) of the Expo is open to the general public for free admission. The Public Day will feature a series of events and activities, including Green Mart, Green Workshops, Public Day Forum and micro-movie premiere.
Situated at 3 Kai Shing Street, Kowloon Bay, the former Hong Kong Air Cargo Terminal 2 building was converted into the EMSD headquarters building in 2005, which is a pilot revitalization and green building exemplary project, as manifested in its revitalization and adaptive reuse, environmentally friendly design and education facilities, construction method, as well as less demolition and construction waste. There is an Education Path in the headquarters building, which is intended to promote awareness of energy efficiency and renewable energy (RE) technologies and to introduce the work of EMSD through the use of fun interactive exhibits for members of the public to learn more about electrical and mechanical safety as well as energy efficiency.
Intro
The HKO Headquarters was established in 1883, and the main building is a declared monument in Hong Kong. The semi-natural woodland at HKO Headquarters is an urban woodland that fosters a diversity of species.
(1) Semi-natural woodland
The woodland at HKO Headquarters is one of the few remaining semi-natural woodlands in Kowloon. A diversity of common tree species can be found there, such as Chinese Banyan, Lance-leaved Sterculia, and Elephant’s Ear. This dense woodland also serves as a natural shelter for city birds, bats, insects and other local wildlife. Some migratory birds likewise utilise this woodland as a stopover, including the Brown Flycatcher and Blackbird, with some even staying for the whole winter.
(2) Climate change
Climate change is likely to become one of the most significant drivers of biodiversity loss worldwide. The rate and magnitude of climate change induced by a rapid rise in greenhouse gas emissions has the power to affect biodiversity both directly and in combination with other drivers of change. For example, it affects the changing of seasons, and disrupts birds’ migration routes and periods, which in turn may cause an adverse interruption to their breeding and foraging opportunities. The Observatory provides scientific input to climate change documents in Hong Kong, and actively supports the policies and actions regarding climate mitigation, adaptation and resilience undertaken and coordinated by the Steering Committee on Climate Change.
Intro
The Hong Kong Zoological and Botanical Gardens (HKZBG) is the oldest park in the territory spanning an area of 5.6 hectares. Built in 1860, the HKZBG was fully completed and opened to the public in 1871.
(1) An urban lookout for plant appreciation
Used to house an assemblage of native plants for collection and research in its early years, the HKZBG was long known as the “Botanic Gardens”. In 1975, it was officially renamed as the “Hong Kong Zoological and Botanical Gardens”. Its vast botanical collection includes representatives of native flora, a number of Old and Valuable Trees, special and rare species plants, and medicinal herbs. Visitors can save themselves the trouble of hiking over Hong Kong’s peaks to learn about the territory’s great variety of plants: the HKZBG offers various thematic gardens, well-labelled tree walks, and free guided visits of the park every Sunday.
(2) Urban parks as oases for wildlife
Parks and gardens with diversified landscapes and vegetation play an important role in enhancing biodiversity in urban areas, as they provide food and refuge for wildlife. To promote the conservation of wildlife such as birds, butterflies and dragonflies, the Leisure and Cultural Services Department has set up “Conservation Corners” in some urban parks. In general, more nectar plants and fruit-bearing trees are planted in these areas to provide food sources for wildlife. Their horticultural maintenance also adopts an ecological approach, such as using less chemicals and adjusting the frequency of pruning and vegetation clearance to minimise disturbance to the wildlife utilising those habitats.
Intro
Kowloon City No. 1 and No. 2 Sewage Pumping Stations were commissioned by the Drainage Services Department (DSD) in 2012. Their design incorporates a number of green building concepts, including green roofs, porous pavements, rain gardens and water harvesting facilities.
(1) Green construction
Kowloon City No.1 Sewage Pumping Station was the first government infrastructure to be awarded the highest Final Platinum Rating under BEAM Plus Assessment for New Buildings. Its installed solar panels can generate and support 15% of the building’s electricity demand. The 60% greening area enhances the landscape features while also providing a thermal insulation capability. Moreover, the floor and other facilities store rainwater, which is used for irrigation and flushing, thus ensuring that water resources are used more efficiently.
(2) Sponge City
“Sponge City” is a modern Stormwater Management approach to help solve drainage problems, fully utilise land resources and promote sustainable development. To combat climate change, DSD encourages the “Sponge City” concept to be adopted in all new developments for more effective drainage and rainwater reuse, which enhances urban flood resilience through the principles of infiltration, retention, storage, purification, reuse and discharge. To implement the concept, DSD is committed to a programme of revitalising water bodies, constructing flood retention lakes, and applying sustainable drainage elements such as green roofs and porous pavements in urban developments.
Intro
In late 2015, DSD started ecological enhancement site trials in a section of Lower Lam Tsuen River near Mui Shue Hang Playground, and a section of Ma Wat River near Jockey Club Road .
(1) Ecological Enhancement Site Trials
In a number of river training works, in addition to upgrading drainage capacities, DSD has also incorporated greening, ecological conservation and water landscape elements into the projects, such as preserving the natural river habitat. In this regard, the site trials replaced the concrete channels with natural river bed substrates and riparian zone. Diverse aquatic habitats such as pools, riffles, resting ground for birds and emergent vegetation were established to improve microhabitats and biodiversity. The preliminary findings of the site trials are promising and show that the complexity of instream habitat and the ecological value of the river channel have improved.
For details regarding DSD’s Eco-hydraulic Study of other selected river channels in Hong Kong, please visit the website “EcoDMS” at https://www.dsd.gov.hk/EcoDMS/EN/Home/Home.html
(2) Blue Green Infrastructure
To maintain Hong Kong as a liveable city, DSD takes sustainable development into important consideration when implementing its various projects. “Blue-Green Infrastructure” refers to an urban drainage system that incorporates natural elements, community features and modern functions. “Blue” broadly refers to water bodies, while “Green” represents plants. In addition to using environmental practices in its construction works, DSD pays particular attention to the ecological conservation of rivers in order to maintain biodiversity.
Intro
In late 2015, DSD started ecological enhancement site trials in a section of Lower Lam Tsuen River near Mui Shue Hang Playground, and a section of Ma Wat River near Jockey Club Road .
(1) Ecological Enhancement Site Trials
In a number of river training works, in addition to upgrading drainage capacities, DSD has also incorporated greening, ecological conservation and water landscape elements into the projects, such as preserving the natural river habitat. In this regard, the site trials replaced the concrete channels with natural river bed substrates and riparian zone. Diverse aquatic habitats such as pools, riffles, resting ground for birds and emergent vegetation were established to improve microhabitats and biodiversity. The preliminary findings of the site trials are promising and show that the complexity of instream habitat and the ecological value of the river channel have improved.
For details regarding DSD’s Eco-hydraulic Study of other selected river channels in Hong Kong, please visit the website “EcoDMS” at https://www.dsd.gov.hk/EcoDMS/EN/Home/Home.html
(2) Blue Green Infrastructure
To maintain Hong Kong as a liveable city, DSD takes sustainable development into important consideration when implementing its various projects. “Blue-Green Infrastructure” refers to an urban drainage system that incorporates natural elements, community features and modern functions. “Blue” broadly refers to water bodies, while “Green” represents plants. In addition to using environmental practices in its construction works, DSD pays particular attention to the ecological conservation of rivers in order to maintain biodiversity.
Intro
Since 2015, T · PARK, a state-of-the-art and self-sufficient sludge treatment facility, integrating advanced science and technology with leisure, education and ecology. It has been awarded the highest Platinum Rating in the Provisional Assessment Stage under the BEAM Plus New Buildings (V1.1) . As one of the most technically advanced facilities of its kind in the world, it represents the city’s vision of embracing the “waste-to-energy” concept. T · PARK is engaged in driving positive change in the attitudes and behaviours of people towards waste management and resource recovery.
(1) Landscape and habitat
Seventy percent of T · PARK is covered by green features, including a five-themed landscape garden, green roofs, and a wetland habitat for wildlife. The facility is planted with local greenery and native species. This includes a spacious 9,800sq.m. landscaped garden that offers a welcome respite from the city, as well as a dedicated bird sanctuary set up as a haven for the district’s water birds.
(2) Turning waste to energy
T · PARK treats sludge from 11 Sewage Treatment Works around the city. By using various advanced technologies, including “fluidised bed” incineration, the sludge is treated through a highly efficient process that reduces the volume of sludge disposal in landfills by up to 90%. The heat generated by the incineration process is recovered for power generation to support the entire facility. Surplus electricity is then exported to the public power grid.
Intro
The Tai Tam Waterworks Heritage Trail is made up of 21 historic waterworks structures which have been declared monuments in the Tai Tam Group of Reservoirs. The Heritage Trail is located within Tai Tam Country Park and the Tai Tam Reservoir Catchment Area, where rich biodiversity can be found.
(1) Ecology of the Tai Tam Group of Reservoirs
Due to its geographical location and terrain, the valley where the Tai Tam Group of Reservoirs is situated is a woodland habitat featuring rich flora and fauna. Many native plants can be found along the Trail, including camellias (such as Hong Kong Camellia, Hong Kong Gordonia, and Crapnell’s Camellia), Buddhist Pine, and Chinese Sweet Gum. In addition to the lush vegetation, a variety of birds, mammals, amphibians, reptiles and insects can be found around the Tai Tam Group of Reservoirs. Indeed, the Tai Tam Reservoir Catchment Area has been named a Site of Special Scientific Interest because of its floristically rich woodland that provides a favourable habitat for animal and bird life.
(2) Water gathering grounds and country parks
About one third of Hong Kong’s land is designated as water gathering grounds where surface runoff is collected for storage. Currently, most of the water gathering grounds overlap with country parks, and are thus protected by the Country Parks Ordinance. As water gathering grounds and impounding reservoirs are both sources of fresh water, members of the public are required to abide by the Waterworks Ordinance, in order to protect these precious water resources.
Tamar Park, located at Harcourt Road, Admiralty, Hong Kong, is a part of the Tamar Development Project. Adjacent to the new Central Government Offices and the Legislative Council Complex, it covers an area of around 1.76 hectares. The park was opened for public use on 10 October 2011. Designed with elegant simplicity, the park offers broad views of the picturesque Victoria Harbour. Spacious green lawns, rolling out like "green carpets", provide a swathe of verdant open space for visitors to stroll or sit.
Intro
Acacia confusa is a tree with a relatively short botanical life expectancy, and those planted over the past five decades are now reaching the stage where their old age may compromise their structural integrity and create a risk of collapse. For example, the trunk can be infected by different fungi, meaning the branches can easily break. To ease the problem of dying trees endangering public safety, the Highways Department is removing old Acacia confusa trees in phases.
(1) Enhancement Programme of Vegetated Slopes
The Highways Department has launched the Enhancement Programme of Vegetated Slopes, working in phases to systematically remove Acacia confusa trees with disease or poor structure, and replanting native and localised species, such as Sapium discolour, Sterculia lanceolate, Viburnum odoratissimum, to create a safe highway landscape that also has a high ecological value for wildlife and aesthetic value for the public’s enjoyment. The waste timber generated from the scheme is recycled for educational use, or upcycled into furniture and wooden sculptures.
(2) Planting native species
Since native plant species are generally more adapted to the local environment and more valuable within the ecosystem as sources of food and habitats for wildlife, the Highways Department will enhance the biodiversity and local environment by planting native and localised species along slopes and areas within High Speed Roads in both urban and rural area maintained by the department. This has a ripple effect in creating more biodiversity on a number of levels, particularly in urban areas.
Yuen Long Bypass Floodway has incorporated a series of environmental designs. Its flow is not carried straight to the sea but passing through different regimes including bends, shallow ponds and wetland. The channel bottom and slope are covered by different species of herbaceous plants to provide a natural riverbank with aesthetic and ecological value. A system of dry weather flow pumping station and inflatable dam is provided at the downstream end to control the water level in the Bypass Floodway and to prevent polluted water in the downstream from flowing back into the Bypass Floodway.
Fung Yuen is situated about 2 kilometers from Tai Po Town Centre. Most of the site is covered by natural / disturbed vegetation. There are some orchards in the foothill areas. A Fung Yuen Butterfly Reserve (2ha) has been managed by the Environmental Association under the Management Agreement Scheme since November 2005.
The Long Valley and Ho Sheung Heung area is situated between the River Beas (Sheung Yue River) and River Sutlej. It is widely recognised as being of high ecological value primarily due to the variety of freshwater wetland-dependent bird species that use its patchwork of wet agricultural habitats. Some of the wet agricultural land and fish ponds have been managed by Conservancy Association and Hong Kong Bird Watching Society under the Management Agreement Scheme since 2005.
The Zero Carbon Building is a signature project for eco-building design and technologies. The ZCB also features an urban native woodland, with diversity of native species to enhance biodiversity for the surrounding.
Kadoorie Farm and Botanic Garden (KFBG) was selected by the Hong Kong SAR Government in 2010 to transform the heritage site, in Hong Kong's New Territories, into a "Green Hub for Sustainable Living" under Batch II of the "Revitalising Historic Buildings Through Partnership Scheme" (Revitalisation Scheme).
The Green Hub has reimagined the Old Tai Po Police Station to demonstrate how we can live sustainably while at the same time respecting nature and respecting each other.
Visitors are invited to enjoy our locally-sourced, healthy food; join one of our transformative educational courses; learn about community events; engage with a network of community members who care about living lightly on our planet; and experience the beauty of this tranquil heritage site.
The Lok Ma Chau wetland located in northwest New Territories has been in operation since 2007 and helps to maintain biodiversity by providing various habitats as the marshes, fishponds and reedbed areas of the wetland provide important roosting sites for migratory birds.
When Island House was completed in 1906, it stood on a small islet called Yuen Chau Tsai, near the head of Tolo Harbour, which was connected to the mainland by a causeway. The two-storey building with open verandahs is a classic example of colonial architecture in the early 20th century. It was erected as quarters for government officers and was long associated with the former New Territories Administration. The building is now used by the World Wide Fund for Nature Hong Kong as a Conservation Studies Centre.
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